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“Lando” by Charles Soule (W) and Alex Maleev (A)

Even the greatest nonbelievers in the power of the Force out there have to admit one thing; Star Wars sure has a talent for creating cult-classic characters that hardly have any screen time at all (I AM LOOKING AT YOU BOBA FETT!!!)The titular hero is exactly such a character. I am no saint; the lovable scoundrel from Bespin is one of my favorites as well, so I could not resist the chance to read his mini series, especially if it is written by THE MAN WHO KILLED WOLVERINE (I love this click-bait nick name). Continue reading ““Lando” by Charles Soule (W) and Alex Maleev (A)”

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“The Door” by Magda Szabó

Reading this book was a struggle. It took me much longer than I am comfortable to admit. Partially it was caused by many distractions and duties that kept me away from reading and partially because I did not enjoy it. Continue reading ““The Door” by Magda Szabó”

“Seven to Eternity, Vol. 1: The God of Whispers” by Rick Remender (W) and Jerome Opeña (A)

As far as fantasy goes it is safe to say that the genre revolves around the same old clichés. It is difficult to go beyond the worn out standards of dwarves, elves and dragons. That is why Seven to Eternity is so refreshing. The fact that it is so beautiful doesn’t hurt either.  Continue reading ““Seven to Eternity, Vol. 1: The God of Whispers” by Rick Remender (W) and Jerome Opeña (A)”

“The Girl with Seven Names: A North Korean Defector’s Story” by Hyeonseo Lee

When it comes to my reading choices I usually stick to fiction. I am not prejudiced in any way, it is just a residue from many sleepless nights which I spent as a child with a fantasy novel in one hand a flash light in the other. Yet sometimes I manage to break the mold. I am glad I did it for this book. Continue reading ““The Girl with Seven Names: A North Korean Defector’s Story” by Hyeonseo Lee”

“The Vision: Vol. 1 Little Worse Than A Man” by Tom King (W) and Gabriel Hernandez Walta (A)

A huge shared comic universes like those of Marvel and DC  give a unique feeling of being part of something greater. The crossovers and guest appearances of other characters are always a lot of fun. Unfortunately it also limits the creative freedom of the artists. You can’t get too quirky or experimental with flagship characters, too much relies on them. Of course every now and then we get our Hydra Cap and Superior Spider-Man, but at the core they are still classical super hero stories. That is why I love it so much when lesser characters are given a more independent spin. Continue reading ““The Vision: Vol. 1 Little Worse Than A Man” by Tom King (W) and Gabriel Hernandez Walta (A)”

“All Star Superman Vol. 1” by Grant Morrison (W) and Frank Quitely (A)

I have a theory explaining why good old Superman is so disliked nowadays. Almost everyone says that Supes is a boring boy scout wearing his underwear on the wrong side of his pants. I dare to disagree. Continue reading ““All Star Superman Vol. 1” by Grant Morrison (W) and Frank Quitely (A)”

“Pylon” by William Faulkner

I meant to grab Faulkner’s novel for a while now. Any novel to be honest. He is one of the great American authors and getting to know his body of work seemed a a duty to me. So when I snatched a vintage copy of Pylon just for around 1 euro ( a price at which it is difficult to buy a bookmark) I considered myself lucky. In a hindsight it is obvious that I have chosen wrong book to start my expedition into the literary world of a new author. My Faulkner hype train did not even leave its station.  Continue reading ““Pylon” by William Faulkner”

“Green Arrow Vol 1: Quiver” by Kevin Smith (W) and Phil Hester (A)

What’s the point of Robon Hood’s copy cats sharing the stories with god like beings or and tricksters worthy of ancient myths? I don’t know either. Yet somehow, movies made Hawkeye work quite naturally next to likes of Iron Man and Thor and CW’s Green Arrow series was enjoyable for about three seasons if you are as forgiving as me. A couple years ago it was proven to me that Hawkeye comics can work so it was only fair to give a chance to his DC counterpart.  Continue reading ““Green Arrow Vol 1: Quiver” by Kevin Smith (W) and Phil Hester (A)”

“The Star Diaries” by Stanisław Lem

The good science fiction does not tell stories about future, it only uses the fantastical setting of the days to come  and the potential hidden in technology and our own bodies to put a mirror in front of the present society and dissect it; examines its fears and deviations and asks questions about our own nature. Continue reading ““The Star Diaries” by Stanisław Lem”

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